CPFC BBS

CPFC BBS (https://www.cpfc.org/forums/index.php)
-   General Chit Chat (https://www.cpfc.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=18)
-   -   Things that annoy you (https://www.cpfc.org/forums/showthread.php?t=255975)

Pat of the Palace 22-12-2017 11:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maidstoned Eagle (Post 14007002)
My daughters art teacher who, I found out today, called her a "Guiri". And my wife, who wonīt let me go to the school to discuss this with said teacher.

I wouldn't stand for that Pedro. I tore into the English teacher (non native natch) at my kids' school for mispronouncing his surname.

They love a bit of constructive criticism really ;)

Purepalace 22-12-2017 11:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maidstoned Eagle (Post 14007002)
My daughters art teacher who, I found out today, called her a "Guiri". And my wife, who wonīt let me go to the school to discuss this with said teacher.

I'm assuming that's an insult and, if so, how is it different to dago or spick?

Pat of the Palace 22-12-2017 11:52 PM

Guiri is the word they use for northern European foreigners. Casual racism as per usual.

Yoda 22-12-2017 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Purepalace (Post 14007798)
I'm assuming that's an insult and, if so, how is it different to dago or spick?

Negative term for a tourist, typically a blonde beach dweller, who enjoys a drink.

Not appropriate term for a teacher to call their pupil.

Context could be relevant....could it have been a one-off jokey aside, said with a smile?

Or has it been said nastily, or repeatedly? You donít want a teacher using this sort of term regularly, because then the other pupils might pick up on it and think itís OK to repeat it, potentially causing issues for his daughter.

Purepalace 22-12-2017 11:57 PM

Thanks Pat. Would the words dago or spick be considered the same i.e casual racist?

El Aguila 22-12-2017 11:58 PM

I use it all the time to describe myself, or north Europeans I’m annoyed with.

elgin eagle 23-12-2017 12:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pat of the Palace (Post 14007807)
Guiri is the word they use for northern European foreigners. Casual racism as per usual.

Give him a slap and say this is a friendly greeting where I'm from.

Purepalace 23-12-2017 12:05 AM

Look , I'm not trying to start a fight but I've read the OP using those terms several times and I get it BUT you can't get mad if it goes the other way.

Nostrils 23-12-2017 12:10 AM

A teacher using those words against somebody that's in their care is a whole different matter.

Purepalace 23-12-2017 12:18 AM

Fair enough. I can see that too.

Pat of the Palace 23-12-2017 06:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by El Aguila (Post 14007815)
I use it all the time to describe myself, or north Europeans Iím annoyed with.

I do too. Also the phrase orgull guiri.

Doesn't make it ok for a teacher to say it to a kid.

Vince Hilaire's Afro 23-12-2017 06:40 AM

Catching your smallest two toes on the edge of the door frame on the one day you didn't put on your slippers

strawberry mivi 23-12-2017 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elgin eagle (Post 14006825)
Doesn't happen in Cyprus. They just go as soon as the crossing is empty.

Driving (and parking) in Cyprus will always bring back special memories for me.
The creeping forward at junctions is a speciality I won't ever forget.

Maidstoned Eagle 23-12-2017 08:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Purepalace (Post 14007819)
Look , I'm not trying to start a fight but I've read the OP using those terms several times and I get it BUT you can't get mad if it goes the other way.

Me calling myself a Guiri, or my Malaga supporting mates who call themselves "The Guiri Army" is one thing, a teacher using it to a 12 year old girl is something else entirely.

PIE "N" MASH 23-12-2017 10:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maidstoned Eagle (Post 14008029)
Me calling myself a Guiri, or my Malaga supporting mates who call themselves "The Guiri Army" is one thing, a teacher using it to a 12 year old girl is something else entirely.

What is the meaning of the word?

El Aguila 23-12-2017 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pat of the Palace (Post 14007961)
I do too. Also the phrase orgull guiri.

Doesn't make it ok for a teacher to say it to a kid.

Yeah, true. I donít think they think of it as an insult. But sure, itís not all right.

El Aguila 23-12-2017 11:37 AM

Apparently it comes from a Basque word, “Guiristino”, used in the wars of succession in the 19th century by the Carlists for the other side, those who supported the claims of Maria Cristina. The Basques were mostly Carlists and thought of the gŁiris as liberal, foreign and hence a bit sinister.

CK 23-12-2017 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PIE "N" MASH (Post 14008220)
What is the meaning of the word?

Tourist/foreigner typically from the northern areas. I believe anyway.

chrisophiex 23-12-2017 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CK (Post 14008265)
Tourist/foreigner typically from the northern areas. I believe anyway.


I thought it was "bin dippers"

Oh....northern Spain :p

CK 23-12-2017 11:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisophiex (Post 14008276)
I thought it was "bin dippers"

Oh....northern Spain :p

No I think it's us , Germans, Skandies etc

Check better with the Costa Clan and El Ag.


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:00 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.